Verb Tense Forms

verb tense formsI asked some students if they thought an example of each form would be helpful, and they said yes. Here examples of each form in a question and in a statement.

Present

Statements

  • I walk to work everyday.
  • He walks to work everyday.
  • She walks to work everyday.
  • You  walk to work everyday.
  • It walks to work everyday.
  • We walk to work everyday.

Questions

  • Do I walk to work everyday?
  • Does he walk to work everyday?
  • Does she walk to work everyday?
  • Do you  walk to work everyday?
  • Does It walk to work everyday?
  • Do we walk to work everyday?

Present  progressive

Statements

  • I am talking to you.
  • He is talking to you.
  • She is talking to you.
  • You are talking to yourself.
  • It is talking to you.
  • We are talking to you.

Questions

  • Am I talking to you?
  • Is he is talking to you?
  • Is she talking to you?
  • Are you are talking to yourself?
  • Is is talking to you?
  • Are we are talking to you?

Past

Statements

  • I jumped over the hole.
  • He jumped over the hole.
  • She jumped over the hole.
  • You jumped over the hole.
  • It jumped over the hole.
  • We jumped over the hole.

Question

  • Did I jump over the hole?
  • Did he jump over the hole?
  • Did she jump over the hole?
  • Did you jump over the hole?
  • Did it jump over the hole?
  • Did we jump over the hole?

Past progressive

Statements

  • I was singing along with the song.
  • He was singing along with the song.
  • She  was singing along with the song.
  • You were singing along with the song.
  • It was singing along with the song.
  • We were singing along with the song.

Question

  • Was I singing along with the song?
  • Was he singing along with the song?
  • Was she singing along with the song?
  • Were you singing along with the song?
  • Was it singing along with the song?
  • Were we singing along with the song?

Future

Statements

  • I will jog home.
  • He will jog home.
  • She will jog home.
  • You will jog home.
  • It will jog home.
  • We will jog home.

Questions

  • Will I jog home?
  • Will he jog home?
  • Will she jog home?
  • Will you jog home?
  • Will it jog home?
  • Will we jog home?

Future progressive

Statements

  • I will be skating tonight.
  • He will be skating tonight.
  • She will be skating tonight.
  • You will be skating tonight.
  • It will be skating tonight.
  • We will be skating tonight.

Questions

  • Will I be skating tonight?
  • Will he be skating tonight?
  • Will she be skating tonight?
  • Will you be skating tonight?
  • Will it be skating tonight?
  • Will we be skating tonight?

Present perfect

Statements

  • I have dug a hole before.
  • He has dug a hole before.
  • She has dug a hole before.
  • You have dug a hole before.
  • It has dug a hole before.
  • We have dug a hole before.

Questions

  • Have  I dug a hole before?
  • Has he dug a hole before?
  • Has she dug a hole before?
  • Have you dug a hole before?
  • Has is dug a hole before?
  • Have we  dug a hole before?

Present perfect progressive

Statements

  • I have been shouting all day.
  • He has been shouting all day.
  • She has been shouting all day.
  • You have been shouting all day.
  • It has been shouting all day.
  • We have been shouting all day.

Questions

  • Have I been shouting all day?:
  • Has he been shouting all day?
  • Has she been shouting all day?
  • Have you been shouting all day?
  • Has it been shouting all day?
  • Have we been shouting all day?

Past perfect

Statements

  • I had flown over the sea before.
  • He had flown over the sea before.
  • She had flown over the sea before.
  • You had flown over the sea before.
  • It had flown over the sea before.
  • We had flown over the sea before.

Questions

  • Had I flown over the sea before?
  • Had he flown over the sea before?
  • Had she flown over the sea before?
  • Had you flown over the sea before?
  • Had it  flown over the sea before?
  • Had we flown over the sea before?

Past perfect progressive

Statements

  • I had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • He had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • She had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • You had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • It had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • We had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.

Questions

  • Had I been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had he been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had she been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had you been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had it been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had we been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?

Future perfect

Statements

  • I will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • He  will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • She will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • You will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • It will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • We will have finished my work by the time you arrive.

Questions

  • Will I have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will he have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will she  have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will you have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will it have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will we have finished my work by the time you arrive?

Future perfect progressive

Statements

  • I will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • He  will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • She will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • You will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • It will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • We will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.

Questions

  • Will I have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will he have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will she have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will you have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will it have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will we have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?

The verb tense overview is a helpful place for you as well.

Are there any other forms that you want to see? Leave a comments below.

Present Perfect vs Past Perfect

Present perfect vs Past perfect
What is the difference between past perfect and present perfect?

Present perfect vs past perfect  is difficult to understand at times. The most common question that I get is, “What is the difference?”

Check out this post and this one if you need some review of the past perfect and present perfect.

Look at past perfect

Past perfect focuses on events that finished in the past. These events do not continue until now.

  • e.g. I had watched my favourite movie ten times before the DVD stopped working.

In the example above, both of the events started and finished  in the past. The person watched the DVD ten times. After that, the DVD stopped working.  Remember that when you use the past perfect you are trying to relate two events together in the past. Past perfect indicates which event happened first in time. In a timeline you would see past perfect then past.

Let’s look at the present perfect

Present perfect normally has some connection or relevance to the present.

  • e.g. I have watched my favourite movie many times, and my DVD is still working.
In the example above, we know that the person watched the movie many times and will continue to do so until the DVD stops working. The reason the person is using the present perfect in this example is because it is relevant to the conversation.

Present perfect vs past perfect Summary

Here is a present perfect vs past perfect chart that will help summarize the information.

Present perfect Past perfect
Used to talk about something that started in the past and continues until now.e.g. I have worked for Ford for ten years.

  • I still work there now.

Used to talk about events that finished in the past but have relevance now.

e.g. I have seen Avatar.

  • I saw Avatar at some unspecified time in the past. It is relevant to the conversation that is happening.
Used to talk about something that started and finished in the past. There is no connection with right now.e.g. I had seen the first Star Wars movie three times before the second movie came out.

  • Both of these events started and finished in the past. They do not continue until now.

If you are looking for some practice in either of these tenses, check out englishpage.com.

Do you have any confusing examples that you would like clarified? Leave a comment below with your example.

Present Perfect

Present perfect is a tense that we use very often when we are speaking.

Form

We create affirmative present perfect sentences by have/has + past participle.

  • e.g. have seen
  • e.g. have gone
  • e.g. have got
We create negative present perfect sentences by have/has + not + past participle.
  • e.g. have not seen
  • e.g. have not gone
  • e.g. have not got
We create present perfect questions by have/has + subject + past participle.
  • e.g. have you  seen?
  • e.g. have you gone?
  • e.g. have you got?

There are a couple different ways we use present perfect:

  1. We use it when something started in the past and continues until now. e.g. I have worked at Ford since 1950.
  2. It can also be used to talk about something that finished at non-specific time in the past. e.g. I have seen Avatar before.

Errors to avoid

These two ways often get mixed up. Sometimes people use present perfect when they should use simple past.
  • e.g. I have seen Titanic last night.  (incorrect)
  • The above example is wrong because  it has a time reference in a present perfect sentence.
  • e.g. I have seen Titanic. (correct)
  • The above is correct because it does not specify the time.
A common mistake that French people make is translating French into English. What happens is passe compose is translated into present perfect. This is an incorrect translation and causes confusion. Passe compose is a past tense, but present perfect is not. This is where the confusion comes from.
  • e.g. J’ai vu un film hier. Which translates into > I have seen a film yesterday.
Some questions that you will hear often using present perfect are:
  • How have you been?
  • What have you been up to lately?

Using Since and For

  • Since + start time
    • e.g. I have worked for CIDA since 2007.
  • For + duration of time
    • e.g. I have worked for CIDA for five years.
In terms of the PSC Language tests, present perfect can present some problems if you are not comfortable with it. For the oral test, you have you to make sure that listen carefully to what the evaluator is asking, and be sure to reply in the same grammar tense.
For some exercises check out Englishpage.com