Verb Tense Forms

verb tense formsI asked some students if they thought an example of each form would be helpful, and they said yes. Here examples of each form in a question and in a statement.

Present

Statements

  • I walk to work everyday.
  • He walks to work everyday.
  • She walks to work everyday.
  • You  walk to work everyday.
  • It walks to work everyday.
  • We walk to work everyday.

Questions

  • Do I walk to work everyday?
  • Does he walk to work everyday?
  • Does she walk to work everyday?
  • Do you  walk to work everyday?
  • Does It walk to work everyday?
  • Do we walk to work everyday?

Present  progressive

Statements

  • I am talking to you.
  • He is talking to you.
  • She is talking to you.
  • You are talking to yourself.
  • It is talking to you.
  • We are talking to you.

Questions

  • Am I talking to you?
  • Is he is talking to you?
  • Is she talking to you?
  • Are you are talking to yourself?
  • Is is talking to you?
  • Are we are talking to you?

Past

Statements

  • I jumped over the hole.
  • He jumped over the hole.
  • She jumped over the hole.
  • You jumped over the hole.
  • It jumped over the hole.
  • We jumped over the hole.

Question

  • Did I jump over the hole?
  • Did he jump over the hole?
  • Did she jump over the hole?
  • Did you jump over the hole?
  • Did it jump over the hole?
  • Did we jump over the hole?

Past progressive

Statements

  • I was singing along with the song.
  • He was singing along with the song.
  • She  was singing along with the song.
  • You were singing along with the song.
  • It was singing along with the song.
  • We were singing along with the song.

Question

  • Was I singing along with the song?
  • Was he singing along with the song?
  • Was she singing along with the song?
  • Were you singing along with the song?
  • Was it singing along with the song?
  • Were we singing along with the song?

Future

Statements

  • I will jog home.
  • He will jog home.
  • She will jog home.
  • You will jog home.
  • It will jog home.
  • We will jog home.

Questions

  • Will I jog home?
  • Will he jog home?
  • Will she jog home?
  • Will you jog home?
  • Will it jog home?
  • Will we jog home?

Future progressive

Statements

  • I will be skating tonight.
  • He will be skating tonight.
  • She will be skating tonight.
  • You will be skating tonight.
  • It will be skating tonight.
  • We will be skating tonight.

Questions

  • Will I be skating tonight?
  • Will he be skating tonight?
  • Will she be skating tonight?
  • Will you be skating tonight?
  • Will it be skating tonight?
  • Will we be skating tonight?

Present perfect

Statements

  • I have dug a hole before.
  • He has dug a hole before.
  • She has dug a hole before.
  • You have dug a hole before.
  • It has dug a hole before.
  • We have dug a hole before.

Questions

  • Have  I dug a hole before?
  • Has he dug a hole before?
  • Has she dug a hole before?
  • Have you dug a hole before?
  • Has is dug a hole before?
  • Have we  dug a hole before?

Present perfect progressive

Statements

  • I have been shouting all day.
  • He has been shouting all day.
  • She has been shouting all day.
  • You have been shouting all day.
  • It has been shouting all day.
  • We have been shouting all day.

Questions

  • Have I been shouting all day?:
  • Has he been shouting all day?
  • Has she been shouting all day?
  • Have you been shouting all day?
  • Has it been shouting all day?
  • Have we been shouting all day?

Past perfect

Statements

  • I had flown over the sea before.
  • He had flown over the sea before.
  • She had flown over the sea before.
  • You had flown over the sea before.
  • It had flown over the sea before.
  • We had flown over the sea before.

Questions

  • Had I flown over the sea before?
  • Had he flown over the sea before?
  • Had she flown over the sea before?
  • Had you flown over the sea before?
  • Had it  flown over the sea before?
  • Had we flown over the sea before?

Past perfect progressive

Statements

  • I had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • He had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • She had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • You had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • It had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • We had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.

Questions

  • Had I been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had he been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had she been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had you been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had it been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had we been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?

Future perfect

Statements

  • I will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • He  will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • She will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • You will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • It will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • We will have finished my work by the time you arrive.

Questions

  • Will I have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will he have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will she  have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will you have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will it have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will we have finished my work by the time you arrive?

Future perfect progressive

Statements

  • I will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • He  will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • She will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • You will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • It will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • We will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.

Questions

  • Will I have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will he have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will she have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will you have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will it have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will we have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?

The verb tense overview is a helpful place for you as well.

Are there any other forms that you want to see? Leave a comments below.

Simple Past Vs Present Perfect

This post is from another site that I run. I reworked it a little to make it look better.

Simple past

We use simple past when we know something is in the past and completed

  • e.g. I saw that dog.

We can also use the simple past  to tell a series of  events in order in the past.

  • e.g. I saw that dog. I saw that cat.

We use this form to tell stories.

Normally, we use a time reference when we talk in the past tense.

  • e.g. I saw that dog yesterday.

Simple Past vs Present Perfect is a hard comparison for some people because there are times you can say both.

  • e.g. I saw that dog vs I have seen that dog.

In this example both mean the same thing because we don’t specify the time.

Therefore, the question is why would I need to use one over the other. It really boils down to context a lot of the time. In the “I have seen that dog”  example it is likely that the person is seeing the dog right at that time. That is likely the reason they are saying that they have seen it. However, in the other example we are unsure when the person saw the dog. Often the question that would follow after a statement like “I saw that dog” is “when did you see that dog?”

Keywords

yesterday – last year/month/week/day – ago

Present perfect

We use present perfect in two ways.

Unspecified time

We can use it when we don’t specify the time, and the event was in the past.

  • e.g. I have seen that dog.

We can also use the present perfect when something has happened more than once in the past when we don’t specify the time.

  • e.g. I have seen that dog many times.

Action started in the past and continues until now

The other way that the present perfect we use present perfect is when something started in the past and continues until now.

  • e.g. I have had that dog since I was young.

When you use present perfect a time reference is NOT used.Correcte.g. I have seen that dogIncorrect

  • e.g. I have seen that dog yesterday.

Things to look out for

One common mistake made by French people specifically is that they translate directly from French to English.

  • e.g. J’ai vu un film hier which translated directly means I have seen a film yesterday.

This is wrong because you are using a time reference while using the Present Perfect. The correct translation would be;

I saw a film yesterday.

Keywords

yet – already – lately – for – since – ever – so far

Also, if you want to do some exercises about this you can find them at either English Page or at EGO4U.

Is there anything else you find confusing about simple past vs present perfect?

Simple Past

Simple past is used very often when people are telling stories about something that occurred in the past.

We use simple past for

  1. A completed action in the past. e.g. I walked to work yesterday.
  2. A repeated past action in the past. e.g. I studied hard in school.
  3. A sequence of events that happened in order. e.g. I walked home then a talked to a friend.
Some common keywords for the simple past
  1. Yesterday
  2. Last night/month/year
  3. Ten days ago
  4. In 1975

If you see one of these keywords, it indicates that the sentence is in the past.

For more on verb tenses, check out the verb tense overview, or for some practice check out Englishpage.com