Persuade Someone With These Words

Using persuasive words from copywriting
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I recently read the five most persuasive words in the English language on copyblogger.com,  and an interesting idea came to my mind, “what if I can use these words to persuade someone in a business environment?”

The five most persuasive words in the English language are: you, free, because, instantly, and new. These words are primarily for copywriting, but I feel that they can work in conversation and writing as well.

You

We can use  the word “you” to persuade people. If you use the word “you”, you will be able to make the person think that it was their idea.

For example:

  • You might be right with that.
  • I think you have something there.
  • You have some great ideas.

By complementing somebody by using you, you are giving them positive feedback. The more positive feedback you give somebody, the higher chance that they are going to agree with you.

Another example that comes to mind is, “you are going to love this”. Consider when people use this particular phrase. They are using it when they are trying to persuade you to buy something. In most cases, it is a friend who thinks you will enjoy something .

You can use this same tactic when trying to convince your boss of something.

Free

People throw around the word “free” too much. We often toss around “free” frivolously and without any particular reason. Because it gets tossed around so often, you need to be careful when you use it.

  • Check out this free e-book.
  • Sing up for free.
  • Free with any purchase of X.

Many websites these days use that type of language to urge you to download their free e-book. What you might not know is, they are using the e-book as a hook to get you to sign up using your email address.

I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase the money is in the list, particularly the email list.

How can you use the word free to persuade someone?

When you’re in the office and someone is offering you something for free you are  more likely to take it.

What the word free is basically doing is taking away the reason to say no if you use it correctly.

Let’s think about your boss. If you tell your boss this new thing is free, what is the risk involved? If there isn’t any risk involved, chances are much greater that someone is going to take a chance.

Because

Because is a powerful word. It explains the reason(s) why we do something. It can explain the reason you should buy something. Understanding is  key with this word. By explaining why someone should buy something, they are able to make an informed decision.

Let’s go back to the office example. Let’s say you want to try something new in the office, and all you say to your boss is, “we should try this.” That doesn’t give your boss any reason to try it at all.  Now if you throw in “because”, it provides that reason. Understanding allows your boss to make a rational and logical decision.

Here are a couple of examples:

  • I like your idea because it provides a lot of insight into why we are investing.
  • I like dogs because they are cute and cuddly.
  • I love English because I can use it anywhere in the world

Instantly

Instantly is another great word that you can use when you are trying to persuade somebody. Most of the time “instantly” is for when people want to buy products.

However, by telling your boss that he can instantly see results from this new idea you want to implement, it provides your boss with instant gratification.

Another way you can use instantly is by saying that you will instantly receive a video or a document that is only available to them.

This word gives people instant gratification, which in  a world of technology is a must.

Here are a few examples:

  • You can instantly see results.
  • You instantly get twenty dollars back.

New

This word is  a little difficult to use if you are in a government job. Most of the time governments don’t want things that are new.

But if you are in the private industry, new things are a breath of fresh air that the company wants. Everyone loves shiny things. They are the new things that people love to have.

Look at these examples,

  • This new car could be yours.
  • The new ipad is fantastic.
  • This new design will reshape the world.
Using the word “new” makes all of those examples interesting by piquing your interest.
So try out the word “new” next time you are persuading someone.

Attempted Persuasion

I made a quick video to try to illustrate these words and  the way you might use them.

Check out the video below. Can’t see the video click here.

 

How are you going to persuade someone using these words?

Sample oral test questions

Some oral test questions for ESL tests
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Students often ask me about oral test questions, so I  will take this opportunity to give you a few sample questions that you might see on an  oral exam.

Typically, the types of questions you will see are about work. One quick tip that you might want to know is to  remember your job vocabulary. The questions are about your job, and not knowing your job vocabulary is very dangerous when it comes to doing a test.

The following oral test questions are what you would see for the PSC oral test. However, you can see these types of questions for any oral exam for English as a second language learners.

As a quick reminder there are four parts to the PSC oral exam

  • Part one: consists of simple questions about your job.
  • Part two: consists of audio conversations and audio voice mail messages. You have to listen to these messages and report what they said. Therefore, knowing reported speech is very important.
  • Part three: You get three options and you choose one of the options. Then you have 90 seconds to prepare an answer to  the question you chose. It  is important to practice your listening skills because the evaluator will read you the question and you will not see it.
  • Part four: not everybody gets to part four. Part four consists of long audio conversations. Again, it is important to know reported speech.
Check out PSC exam outline here.

Sample questions part one

  • Where do you work?
  • Where is your office?
  • What is your position?
  • What do you do in your job?
  • What organization do you work for?
  • What is the role of your organization?
  • How does your job affect Canadians?
  • Where is your building located?
  • What is your schedule?
  • Do you like your work schedule?
  • At what point in the year are you the busiest?
  • Which tools do you  use at work?

Sample questions for part two

You will hear questions like:

  • What is the reason for the call?
  • What was the problem?
  • What was the solution?

Because these questions are all related to the audio you will hear, is important that you practice your listening skills. If you want to practice your listening skills, try listening to the news. Some places that you can listen to use are places like CBC, BBC and CNN.

Check out my recommended links for places where you can practice your listening skills now.

Sample questions for part three

  • Describe a leadership role which you have held.
  • Describe a situation when you have helped someone at work.
  • Describe how you obtained your current position.
  • Describe how you resolved  a problem at work.
  • Describe the project in which you put a great deal of effort forth.
  • Describe a situation in which you received feedback from someone.
  • Describe a unique person with whom you have worked.
  • Describe a good leader with whom you have worked.
  • What do you think of flex hours?
  • Compare flex hours to compressed hours?
  • What are three characteristics of a great manager?
  • What do you like about your position? And why?
  • Describe an occasion when you met the deadline because you had a great team and a great boss.

 Sample question part four

The questions  asked in part four are typically questions about opinion. They opinion will usually be about the audio file that you have heard on the computer.

  • What did you think about the decision that was made in the audio file?
  • Do you agree with the decision?
  • What would you have done?
What questions would you add?

 

 

Verb Tense Forms

verb tense formsI asked some students if they thought an example of each form would be helpful, and they said yes. Here examples of each form in a question and in a statement.

Present

Statements

  • I walk to work everyday.
  • He walks to work everyday.
  • She walks to work everyday.
  • You  walk to work everyday.
  • It walks to work everyday.
  • We walk to work everyday.

Questions

  • Do I walk to work everyday?
  • Does he walk to work everyday?
  • Does she walk to work everyday?
  • Do you  walk to work everyday?
  • Does It walk to work everyday?
  • Do we walk to work everyday?

Present  progressive

Statements

  • I am talking to you.
  • He is talking to you.
  • She is talking to you.
  • You are talking to yourself.
  • It is talking to you.
  • We are talking to you.

Questions

  • Am I talking to you?
  • Is he is talking to you?
  • Is she talking to you?
  • Are you are talking to yourself?
  • Is is talking to you?
  • Are we are talking to you?

Past

Statements

  • I jumped over the hole.
  • He jumped over the hole.
  • She jumped over the hole.
  • You jumped over the hole.
  • It jumped over the hole.
  • We jumped over the hole.

Question

  • Did I jump over the hole?
  • Did he jump over the hole?
  • Did she jump over the hole?
  • Did you jump over the hole?
  • Did it jump over the hole?
  • Did we jump over the hole?

Past progressive

Statements

  • I was singing along with the song.
  • He was singing along with the song.
  • She  was singing along with the song.
  • You were singing along with the song.
  • It was singing along with the song.
  • We were singing along with the song.

Question

  • Was I singing along with the song?
  • Was he singing along with the song?
  • Was she singing along with the song?
  • Were you singing along with the song?
  • Was it singing along with the song?
  • Were we singing along with the song?

Future

Statements

  • I will jog home.
  • He will jog home.
  • She will jog home.
  • You will jog home.
  • It will jog home.
  • We will jog home.

Questions

  • Will I jog home?
  • Will he jog home?
  • Will she jog home?
  • Will you jog home?
  • Will it jog home?
  • Will we jog home?

Future progressive

Statements

  • I will be skating tonight.
  • He will be skating tonight.
  • She will be skating tonight.
  • You will be skating tonight.
  • It will be skating tonight.
  • We will be skating tonight.

Questions

  • Will I be skating tonight?
  • Will he be skating tonight?
  • Will she be skating tonight?
  • Will you be skating tonight?
  • Will it be skating tonight?
  • Will we be skating tonight?

Present perfect

Statements

  • I have dug a hole before.
  • He has dug a hole before.
  • She has dug a hole before.
  • You have dug a hole before.
  • It has dug a hole before.
  • We have dug a hole before.

Questions

  • Have  I dug a hole before?
  • Has he dug a hole before?
  • Has she dug a hole before?
  • Have you dug a hole before?
  • Has is dug a hole before?
  • Have we  dug a hole before?

Present perfect progressive

Statements

  • I have been shouting all day.
  • He has been shouting all day.
  • She has been shouting all day.
  • You have been shouting all day.
  • It has been shouting all day.
  • We have been shouting all day.

Questions

  • Have I been shouting all day?:
  • Has he been shouting all day?
  • Has she been shouting all day?
  • Have you been shouting all day?
  • Has it been shouting all day?
  • Have we been shouting all day?

Past perfect

Statements

  • I had flown over the sea before.
  • He had flown over the sea before.
  • She had flown over the sea before.
  • You had flown over the sea before.
  • It had flown over the sea before.
  • We had flown over the sea before.

Questions

  • Had I flown over the sea before?
  • Had he flown over the sea before?
  • Had she flown over the sea before?
  • Had you flown over the sea before?
  • Had it  flown over the sea before?
  • Had we flown over the sea before?

Past perfect progressive

Statements

  • I had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • He had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • She had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • You had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • It had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.
  • We had been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up.

Questions

  • Had I been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had he been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had she been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had you been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had it been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?
  • Had we been listening to  music for twenty minutes before you showed up?

Future perfect

Statements

  • I will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • He  will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • She will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • You will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • It will have finished my work by the time you arrive.
  • We will have finished my work by the time you arrive.

Questions

  • Will I have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will he have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will she  have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will you have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will it have finished my work by the time you arrive?
  • Will we have finished my work by the time you arrive?

Future perfect progressive

Statements

  • I will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • He  will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • She will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • You will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • It will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.
  • We will have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over.

Questions

  • Will I have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will he have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will she have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will you have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will it have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?
  • Will we have been cooking for two hours by the time you come over?

The verb tense overview is a helpful place for you as well.

Are there any other forms that you want to see? Leave a comments below.